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Leader Rodgers on Washington Post Live: ADPPA Will Put All Americans in Control of Their Online Data


09.29.22

House Energy and Commerce Committee Republican Leader Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) and Chairman Frank Pallone (D-NJ) joined Leigh Ann Caldwell on Washington Post Live on how the bipartisan American Data Privacy and Protection Act (ADPPA) will establish one strong national standard, put people back in control of their information online, and stop Big Tech from profiting off Americans without their consent.

THE MOST ROBUST PRIVACY PROTECTIONS EVER IN U.S.

“[The ADPPA] gives Americans the right to know what data has been collected and the profiles that have been created.

“For businesses, they’re limited on what data they can even collect in the first case. It has to be for the business purposes and anything beyond that they would only be able to do with permission.

“It allows the individual to opt out of ads if they don’t want to have their personal information collected, their location data, their browsing history.

“It gives the individual the right to know what’s being collected and then if it’s going to be used beyond the business purposes or sold to a third party like a data broker. The individual would have the right to say they do not want their information shared or sold.

“This putting Americans back in charge of their data. This isn’t a partisan issue. This is a priority for Americans and I’m proud of the work that the Energy and Commerce Committee has done, that we have come together and hammered out the most comprehensive privacy protections ever and people are desperate for it.”

PROTECTING OUR CHILDREN FROM BIG TECH

“I’m a mom with three school-aged kids and the protections that are in here for kids are especially important.

[…]

“ADPPA would stop data brokers—third-party entities—or Big Tech from accessing, storing, and selling sensitive information like your location data, login information, your browsing information without your permission.

“For parents, it includes very strong protections for children’s privacy online. Under the age of 17 is protected online.”

ONE STRONG NATIONAL PRIVACY STANDARD

“What it would do is eliminate a patchwork of state laws that are being developed.

“A national standard is very important for a business who does business across state lines or an individual that crosses state lines.

“We need the national standard to provide that certainty no matter where you live, if you’re in California, New Jersey, or Washington state.”

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