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May 24, 2024
Press Release

E&C Leaders to ODNI: What Does the U.S. Intel Community Know About CCP-Linked Security Breach at Canadian High-Containment Lab

Washington, D.C. — In a new letter to Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), Subcommittee on Health Chair Brett Guthrie (R-KY), and Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chair Morgan Griffith (R-VA) have asked for a briefing regarding a Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) report that a high security lab in Canada was infiltrated by Chinese scientists connected to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). BACKGROUND : Recently disclosed information from Canada provides additional insight into the Wuhan Institute of Virology's (WIV) interests and activities in the months leading up to the pandemic. In Canada, it was revealed that Canada's highest security lab (where Ebola and coronaviruses are studied) was infiltrated by Chinese scientists receiving secret payments from China’s military. This information was revealed in a report from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) in February 2024, following a two-year investigation. Two scientists at Canada’s high-security infectious disease laboratory—Xiangguo Qiu and Keding Cheng—provided confidential scientific information to China and were fired in 2021 after a probe concluded Dr. Qiu posed “a realistic and credible threat to Canada’s economic security” and it was discovered they engaged in clandestine meetings with Chinese officials. CSIS discovered Dr. Qiu had applied for, and likely received, a position under China’s Thousand Talents Program and that her position came through the WIV. According to CSIS, Dr. Qiu, who worked at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, lied when confronted about her actions, making “blanket denials” and “half-truths, and personally benefited from the arrangement,” noting that she repeatedly lied to the CSIS and “refused to admit to any involvement in various PRC [People’s Republic of China] programs.” In a January 2021 letter recommending that Dr. Qiu’s security clearance be revoked, CSIS stated: “The Service assess that Ms. Qiu developed deep, cooperative relationships with a variety of People’s Republic of China institutions and has intentionally transferred scientific knowledge and materials to China in order to benefit the PRC government.” The two infectious-disease scientists were escorted out of the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg in July 2019, and later had their security clearances revoked. They were fired in January 2021. Their whereabouts are not known. Of particular concern is that Dr. Qiu covertly and without authorization provided the Ebola genetic sequence, intellectual property related to research of Ebola, and possibly other pathogens to China. Others informed CSIS that Dr. Qiu and her husband used Gmail accounts extensively, rather than her government of Canada emails. This would appear to be a good source of communications between these spy-scientists in Canada and Wuhan and/or the Chinese military. CSIS found an application from her to one of China’s talent programs that said she would work for the WIV for at least two months every year. As part of her enrollment, CSIS said, Dr. Qiu committed to “building the People’s Republic of China’s biosecurity platform for new and potent infectious disease research.” The CSIS investigation found Dr. Qiu led a project at the WIV that would assess cross-species infection and pathogenic risks of filoviruses, work that CSIS said suggests “gain-of-function studies were possibly to take place.” CSIS also noted Dr. Qiu, who headed the vaccine development and antiviral therapies section at the Winnipeg lab, collaborated on scientific papers with Chinese military researchers, including Major-General Chen Wei, a high-ranking officer in the People’s Liberation Army. In a report, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) found Dr. Qiu lied about an October 2018 trip to China that she had said was a personal vacation, but later acknowledged after being presented with contradictory evidence that the trip was paid for by the WIV and she met the WIV’s director during the visit. CLICK HERE to read the full letter.



May 23, 2024
Press Release

Subcommittee Chair Bilirakis Opening Remarks at IDC Markup

Washington, D.C. — House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Innovation, Data, and Commerce Chair Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) delivered the following opening remarks at today’s subcommittee markup of three bills:  As prepared for delivery: “Good morning, and welcome to today’s Subcommittee markup where we will consider three significant Subcommittee priority pieces of legislation to protect Americans’ data privacy rights, protect kids online, and preserve access to AM radio. “I want to thank all the Subcommittee members for their input and feedback on these topics, and I am looking forward to continuing productive conversations in a bipartisan manner to refine these bills as we move through the legislative process.  “We have a historic opportunity to advance legislation that will end the patchwork and finally provide a federal standard to govern how Americans’ personal information is collected, stored, retained, and transferred.  “The American Privacy Rights Act is the strongest consumer data privacy and security framework to date—it provides businesses with certainty through a national preemptive standard, secures individual liberties through strong data minimization provisions, and cements America’s global leadership through data security provisions that warn consumers when their information is being collected and shared with our foreign adversaries, like China and Russia.“  YEARS OF CONGRESSIONAL EFFORT  “For years, Congress has long tried to thread the needle when it comes to getting a national data privacy bill enacted into law, given the many differences in approach from both sides of the political spectrum.  “I want to applaud Chair Rodgers and Chair Cantwell for their tireless efforts to move forward with a framework that strikes this critical balance, as well as all the members on both sides of the aisle that have provisions included in the draft before us today.  “I understand many stakeholders have continued to engage with every office on their requests, and I look forward to hearing from my colleagues about how we can continue to incorporate that feedback.  “I’m thankful for all the constructive comments we’ve received up to this point.  “This is certainly not the last opportunity to deliberate and refine this draft further. “But time is of the essence, so let’s continue to move this process forward to protect Americans privacy rights, promote individual freedoms and civil liberties, and secure data from abuse by bad actors.”  KOSA  “In addition to APRA, I’m proud that we are also considering my bill, H.R. 7891, the Kids Online Safety Act.  “I’m thankful to Rep. Castor for her partnership on this effort, as well as the many colleagues on this Subcommittee who’ve cosponsored our legislation.  Sadly, in the face of an unprecedented youth mental health crisis in this nation, Big Tech has continued to turn a blind eye to harms perpetuated on their online platforms.   “Congress has been forced to step in to ensure children and parents have the safeguards, tools, and transparency measures they need to stay safe.   “KOSA requires the prevention and mitigation of harms to minors, such as the promotion of suicide, depression, substance abuse, sexual exploitation, and illegal drug sales such as fentanyl.  “Too often we’ve seen the design features of social media fuel these problems, rather than prevent them.  “This legislation is not perfect, and I’m hopeful conversations today can illuminate how we can better establish needed protections for children.”  PRESERVING AM RADIO  “Lastly, the Subcommittee will be taking a bipartisan bill I’m leading with Ranking Member Pallone, the AM Radio for Every Vehicle Act .  “At our legislative hearing, we heard from our witnesses about the importance of having a robust emergency alert and public safety communications infrastructure.  “Further, rural and underserved Americans still enjoy listening to AM radio broadcasts for their diverse viewpoints.   “Given AM radio’s significant reach as a medium, much of it taking place in vehicles, we must ensure it remains a readily available option for all Americans, particularly as we approach hurricane season.   “I’m proud to partner with Ranking Member Pallone on this initiative and look forward to advancing it through Subcommittee today.  “In closing, I look forward to working with all my colleagues on both sides of the aisle today to get these critical bills across the finish line."



May 23, 2024
Blog

Innovation, Data, and Commerce Subcommittee Markup Recap: Monumental Step Forward for Data Privacy and Kids Online Safety

Washington D.C. — The House Energy and Commerce Committee advanced proposals today that will establish one national standard for data privacy, protect kids online, and preserve Americans’ access to A.M. radio. In a Subcommittee markup , the Innovation, Data, and Commerce Subcommittee forwarded three pieces of legislation to the Full Committee for consideration. As Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) said , “The American Privacy Rights Act is an opportunity for a reset, one that can help return us to the American Dream our Founders envisioned.  “It gives people the right to control their personal information online, something the American people overwhelmingly want. They’re tired of having their personal information abused for profit.”  Innovation, Data, and Commerce Subcommittee Chair Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) added , “We have a historic opportunity to advance legislation that will end the patchwork and finally provide a federal standard to govern how Americans’ personal information is collected, stored, retained, and transferred.   “The American Privacy Rights Act is the strongest consumer data privacy and security framework to date—it provides businesses with certainty through a national preemptive standard, secures individual liberties through strong data minimization provisions, and cements America’s global leadership through data security provisions that warn consumers when their information is being collected and shared with our foreign adversaries, like China and Russia.”  Legislative Vote Summary: H.R. ____ , the American Privacy Rights Act  discussion draft, was forwarded, without amendment, to the Full Committee by a voice vote.  H.R. 7891 , the Kids Online Safety Act, was forwarded, without amendment, to the Full Committee by a voice vote.  H.R. 8449 , the AM Radio for Every Vehicle Act , was forwarded, without amendment, to the Full Committee by a voice vote. 



May 23, 2024
Press Release

E&C, E&W Republicans Press HHS Secretary Becerra on Preventing Civil Rights Violations at Universities Receiving NIH Grants

Inquiry Part of House-Wide Effort to Combat Rise of Antisemitism on College Campuses Washington, D.C. — In a new letter to Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Xavier Becerra, House Energy and Commerce Committee (E&C) Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), E&C Subcommittee on Health Chair Brett Guthrie (R-KY), and E&C Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chair Morgan Griffth (R-VA), along with House Education and the Workforce Committee (E&W) Chairwoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC) and E&W Subcommittee on Higher Education & Workforce Development Chair Burgess Owens (R-UT), raised concerns over how HHS is ensuring that research universities are preventing harassment and discrimination—particularly against individuals of Jewish faith and heritage. The Chairs note in their letter that colleges or universities that violate Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 can ultimately lose Federal funding.   The investigation comes as part of Speaker Mike Johnson’s (R-LA) House-wide effort to crack down on antisemitism on college campuses.  KEY LETTER EXCERPT :  “We are troubled by the fact that colleges and universities that are recipients of massive amounts of Federal research grants from NIH are actively fostering antisemitism on campus and failing to protect Jewish students, faculty, and support staff. Failing to comply with basic safety protections for members of their communities, no matter the cause, may be grounds for disqualification of universities and colleges from receiving Federal funds. Congress has an obligation to ensure compliance with Title VI. If Congress determines an institution of higher education is in violation, we may consider rescinding research and development funds previously appropriated.”  BACKGROUND :  Starting in April 2024, antisemitic, and at times violent, protests broke out across campuses at several prominent universities—including Columbia University, the University of Southern California (USC), the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), George Washington University (GWU), Harvard University, and Yale University—resulting in unsafe learning and research environments for students, faculty, and staff, especially for those of Jewish faith and heritage.     Beginning on April 17, 2024, an encampment sprung up on Columbia University’s campus with hundreds of protestors and tents.   Protestors vandalized the campus—including residence halls—with banners and signs containing antisemitic sentiments and even support for the terrorist organization Hamas.  Despite over 100 arrests by police, the protests progressed to the occupation of a campus building and physical attacks on Jewish students—leading campus officials to move some classes online.  Professors at Columbia University have openly made antisemitic and even pro-Hamas statements, adding to the harassment of Jewish students.   A prominent rabbi at Columbia University also warned Jewish students to remain off-campus due to fears that the university and New York City police could not keep students safe.   Jewish students on campus have expressed concerns over their safety on campus and the mental and psychological toll the hostile environment is taking on their ability to work and learn.  Columbia University—which across its campuses received more than $682 million in grants from NIH in fiscal year 2023—is just the tip of the iceberg as similar events are spreading to other colleges and universities.   USC—which received more than $358 million in NIH funding in fiscal year 2023—is also overrun with students, faculty, and other anti-Israel protests that led the university to cancel its graduation ceremony out of safety concerns.   A protestor at USC was charged with assault with a deadly weapon—showing the threatening and intimidating nature of these protests. UCLA—which received more than $580 million in NIH grants in fiscal year 2023—is yet another example of the impact these actions have on the ability of students—particularly Jewish students—to learn. Protesters at UCLA have blocked off sections of the campus, refusing access to Jewish students seeking to attend their classes.  According to a phone call with UCLA police, the directive from UCLA was to not interfere with the protestors.  Just a few blocks from the White House at GWU—which received more than $73 million in grants from NIH in fiscal year 2023—encampments spread beyond the campus onto public streets, and for weeks no action was taken to clear the encampments.  At both Yale University—which received more than $621 million in grants from NIH in fiscal year 2023—and Harvard University—which received more than $400 million across its campuses in grants from NIH in fiscal year 2023—concerns about antisemitism circulated even before the protests erupted. Dozens of protestors were arrested after setting up an encampment at Yale University and parts of Harvard University have been closed, with classes held remotely in response to hundreds of protestors gathering on campus.  Several lawsuits have been filed against these universities alleging violations of civil rights protections and failure to provide a safe environment, and the U.S. Department of Education has opened investigations into several colleges and universities—including Columbia University—for potential civil rights violations.  According to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR), colleges and universities are prohibited from discriminating based on a variety of categories—including national origin. These laws also protect students who are, or are perceived to be, members of a religious group—including those of Jewish faith. A college or university is in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 if: 1) there is harassing conduct on the basis of race, color, or national origin that is sufficiently serious as to limit or deny a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the educational program (i.e., creates a hostile environment); 2) a responsible employee of the school knew, or should have known, about the harassment; and 3) the school failed to take prompt and effective steps reasonably calculated to end the harassment, eliminate the hostile environment, prevent the harassment from reoccurring, and as appropriate, remedy its effects.  According to NIH’s Grant Policy Statement, any institution receiving Federal funds must assure work environments are free of discriminatory harassment and are safe and conducive to high-quality work.  HHS’s OCR is responsible for ensuring that institutions that receive Federal financial assistance comply with Title VI as well as other civil rights laws.   Colleges or universities that violate Title VI can ultimately lose Federal funding.   CLICK HERE to read the full letter.



May 23, 2024
Press Release

E&C Republicans to NIH: Is Agency Recovering All Misused Taxpayer Dollars?

Washington, D.C. — In a letter to National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Monica Bertagnolli, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), Subcommittee on Health Chair Brett Guthrie (R-KY), and Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chair Morgan Griffith (R-VA) write regarding their investigation into how NIH recovers misused funds from recipient institutions.  KEY LETTER EXCERPT :  “While NIH funding has resulted in significant advances in science and aided in medical breakthroughs, it is also susceptible to fraud and other misconduct. With more than $35 billion in extramural grants awarded in fiscal year 2023 alone, it is essential that the NIH ensures grant funds are used appropriately and identifies and recovers any misused or abused funds.”  BACKGROUND :  The NIH and its institutes and centers may also become aware of financial misuse or fraud through allegations and complaints made by colleagues at the recipient institution, whistleblowers, or even anonymous complaints. Between fiscal years 2013 and 2022, the NIH received an increasing number of allegations of grant fraud—such as embezzlement and theft of funds—totaling more than 200 allegations.  Several public reports have uncovered substantiated cases of misuse of funding provided by the NIH—including findings that researchers at both Harvard University and Scripps Research Institute improperly charged or overcharged the NIH for time researchers spent on grant activities, leading to over $1.3 million and $10 million being refunded to the NIH respectively.  During the same period, the NIH also received more than 1,000 allegations of research misconduct.   The ORI’s website summarizes nearly 30 cases of substantiated research misconduct—including falsification, fabrication, or plagiarism of data or findings supported by NIH-funded research—since 2018.   These cases involve hundreds of millions of dollars, and it is unknown how much of that funding was used specifically by the person(s) found to have participated in the misconduct.   There are only a handful of public cases in which the NIH has managed to recover some funds from institutions found to have failed to protect the integrity of NIH funding.   For example, in 2019, Duke University agreed to repay $112.5 million to resolve allegations that applications and progress reports submitted to the federal government—including the NIH—contained falsified research.  CLICK HERE to read the full letter. 



May 23, 2024
Press Release

E&C Republicans Investigate Whether CMS CLIA Accreditation Contains Adequate National Security Safeguards

Washington, D.C. — In a new letter to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), Subcommittee on Health Chair Brett Guthrie (R-KY), and Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chair Morgan Griffith (R-VA) are seeking answers as to whether the agency adequately safeguards Clinical Laboratory Improvements Amendments (CLIA) lab accreditation from national security concerns.  The Members are particularly concerned with national security concerns related to the Chinese military and the unethical use of human beings in research studies by entities of concern in China.  BACKGROUND :  Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) is a firm based in Shenzhen used by the Chinese government to build and operate the China National GeneBank, “a vast and growing government-owned repository that includes genetic data drawn from millions of people around the world.”  The Department of Defense in 2022 officially listed BGI as one of several “Chinese military companies” operating in the United States, and a 2021 U.S. intelligence assessment linked the company to the Beijing-directed global effort to obtain even more human DNA, including from the United States.  On March 6, 2023, the Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security added BGI Tech Solutions (Hongkong) Co. Ltd., to the “Entity List,” which identifies entities for which there is reasonable cause to believe, based on specific and articulable facts, that the entities have been involved, are involved, or pose a significant risk of being or becoming involved in activities contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States.  It was added to the entity list “based upon information that indicates their collection and analysis of genetic data poses a significant risk of contributing to monitoring and surveillance by the government of China, which has been utilized in the repression of ethnic minorities in China. Information also indicates that the actions of these entities concerning the collection and analysis of genetic data present a significant risk of diversion to China’s military programs.”  CMS accredited a laboratory owned by BGI in 2017-2019. It then provided a CLIA accreditation to an entity called BGI Tech Solutions (Hongkong) Co. Ltd., effective September 8, 2023, with an expiration date of September 7, 2025, and with the same address and the same point of contact listed in the previous BGI CLIA lab accreditation.  CLICK HERE to read the letter. 



May 23, 2024
In the News

NBC News: Republicans and Democrats in Congress See Critical Window to Shield Online Data

Today, the Innovation, Data, and Commerce Subcommittee is holding a markup of the American Privacy Rights Act to establish one national standard for data privacy and security for people of all ages— including kids —in all 50 states. The bipartisan, bicameral draft legislation gives Americans control over where their information goes and who can sell it, empowers individuals to enforce their data privacy rights, and reins in Big Tech. Don’t miss key excerpts from NBC’s article highlighting the bill below: “The presidential election is a little more than five months away, but key Republicans and Democrats in Congress see a critical window to pass sweeping legislation to shield the online data of both children and adults from Big Tech companies. “‘I believe that there’s a moment here where, on behalf of the American people, Congress needs to act,’ House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., said in an interview on the steps of the Capitol. “‘There’s a recognition, on behalf of protecting our kids online, in protecting all Americans, that we need to ensure that there are privacy rights in place … and that our identity is being protected online and that we’re in control of our data,’ she said. “The Energy and Commerce subcommittee that oversees online data will take the first step in trying to advance the privacy legislation, holding a markup Thursday on the American Privacy Rights Act, broad legislation that includes privacy protections for kids and adults, as well as the Kids Online Safety Act.” [...] “A revised draft bill was announced this week to address critics’ concerns. “The American Privacy Rights Act would create national consumer data privacy rights and set federal standards for securing people’s data rather than have a patchwork of state laws. Among other things, the legislation would require companies to be clear about how they use people’s data and ‘give consumers the right to access, correct, delete, and export their data,’ according to a bill summary. The bill would also limit how companies collect and use data and ban transferring certain data to third parties without consent. “The measure includes the bipartisan bill to protect kids' and teens' online data, known as COPPA 2.0. “‘I see the American Privacy Rights Act as foundational to protecting kids online, foundational to protecting our individual identity online,’ McMorris Rodgers said. “The bipartisan privacy bill is gathering momentum just weeks after McMorris Rodgers and Cantwell reached a compromise on legislation that forces TikTok’s Chinese owner, ByteDance, to sell the popular video-sharing app or face a ban in the U.S. President Joe Biden signed the TikTok bill into law as part of a larger national security package.” CLICK HERE to read the full article. CLICK HERE to learn more about how APRA is foundational to protecting kids online. CLICK HERE for how APRA will help small businesses grow and thrive.



May 23, 2024
Markups

Chair Rodgers Opening Remarks at Innovation, Data, and Commerce Subcommittee Markup of 3 Legislative Proposals

Washington D.C. — House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) delivered the following opening remarks at today’s Innovation, Data, and Commerce Subcommittee markup of three legislative proposals:  “Our personal identity is at the very core of what makes us human.   “It drives us to achieve the impossible and inspires us to pursue our goals and dreams. The ability to express our individual identity helps define who we are and deepen ties to our families and our communities.  “Encouraging individualism and identity is something that’s uniquely American, something the founders envisioned and fought for—a society that’s fiercely individual, where people are free to think, speak, and live their lives the way they want.   “Many believed that the internet could empower the individual even more by creating new ways for people and businesses to connect, innovate, and share information. “Unfortunately, trust has been broken.  “Instead, over time our identity has been slowly eroded our identity, freedom to think for ourselves manipulated, and Big Tech is capturing more and more data to surveil and control over our lives.   “Americans should be in control of how that information is disclosed, and it should be voluntary, not coerced.   “If the founders were here today, they would know, as we know, that this digital tyranny is not the American Dream.”  AMERICAN PRIVACY RIGHTS ACT   “The American Privacy Rights Act is an opportunity for a reset, one that can help return us to the American Dream our Founders envisioned.   “It gives people the right to control their personal information online, something the American people overwhelmingly want. They’re tired of having their personal information abused for profit.   “Right now, a person’s location, for instance, can be shared without their knowledge or permission by apps on their phone.  “This bill stops those apps from sharing or selling this data without permission.  “If a person searches the internet about something personal or something they want kept private that information could be tracked with hidden pixels and shared without them knowing about it.  “This bill keeps people's search history private.  “If someone buys a pair of shoes online, they almost instantly are bombarded with ads across the platforms they use.  “The American Privacy Rights Act gives the power back to the people by equipping them with the knowledge of how their data is being used to monetize, manipulate, and exploit them.” PROTECTING KIDS ONLINE   “This legislation is so important, and it is especially foundational for protecting kids online.  “The average American teenager spends 4.8 hours a day scrolling social media platforms. “I’m a mom. I have three young kids. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. It’s my biggest fear: what’s going to happen online with my kids, because I don’t trust what’s happening at all. “As our kids scroll, companies collect nearly every data point imaginable to build profiles on them and keep them addicted.   “They intentionally target children with dangerous and life-threatening content.   “At our hearing last month, we heard from a young woman, Ava, who shared how Big Tech weaponized her data, collecting this arsenal of data and exploited her vulnerabilities.  “Ava’s story is just one of countless we’ve heard from kids, young adults, and families across the country.  “This legislation gets to the root cause of these problems by minimizing the collection and exploitation of our data.   “It serves as a strong foundation from which to layer on other important policies to protect kids online, like the Kids Online Safety Act, which I’m excited we’re also considering today.  “This draft includes key provisions from the Children Online Privacy Protection Act.  “I’d like to thank Reps. Walberg, Castor, and Senators Markey and Cassidy, for working with us.”  HELPING SMALL BUSINESSES AND ENTREPRENEURS THRIVE   “We can achieve stronger protections for people while also continuing to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship.   “18 states now have comprehensive data privacy laws, which means 18 different sets of rules that growing small businesses and startups are forced to navigate.   “Ensuring compliance is costly.  “Just last week, I had a company tell me they may be forced to pull out of certain states because they simply cannot comply with these conflicting standards.  “Our bill would end this patchwork.  “Today, we’ll also be marking up H.R. 8449, the A.M. Radio for Every Vehicle Act, led by Reps. Bilirakis and Pallone.  “Millions across the country rely on AM radio for critical information, especially during public emergencies. “It’s vital we preserve this resource for Americans. “In the nearly 230-year history of this Committee, we have established a rich tradition of taking on the hard problems and delivering solutions for the people. “We have a moment to change the status quo and reset what our online ecosystem looks like.   “The American Privacy Rights Act is a common sense, bipartisan, bicameral proposal. “I’m grateful for Senator Cantwell for working with me on this landmark legislation, as well as Ranking Member Pallone, who has been a trusted partner over the years as we have worked together on privacy and worked to improve this current draft.  “As John Dingell has been known to say, there hasn’t been a perfect law since Moses came down from the mountain.  “I urge my colleagues to advance the legislation today and I look forward to continuing working with all members and stakeholders to further perfect it before the full committee markup.” 



May 22, 2024
Markups

Chairs Rodgers and Bilirakis Announce IDC Subcommittee Markup

Washington D.C. — House Energy and Commerce Committee Chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) and Innovation, Data, and Commerce Subcommittee Chair Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) today announced a subcommittee markup of three bills.  "The days of Big Tech collecting unlimited data points on individuals and manipulating Americans online are numbered. It’s time for a reset of the internet ecosystem. The American Privacy Rights Act will usher in a new era by giving people the right to control their own data by reclaiming their identities and restoring America’s founding principles of freedom and self-determination,”  said Chairs Rodgers and Bilirakis.  “We also look forward to advancing critical policies to protect kids online and to ensure people continue to have access to A.M. radio. The Energy and Commerce Committee has a rich history of advancing important legislation in a bipartisan way, and we look forward to building on that legacy this week." WHAT: A Subcommittee on Innovation, Data, and Commerce markup of three legislative solutions.  DATE: Thursday, May 23, 2024  TIME: 10:00 AM ET  LOCATION: 2123 Rayburn House Office Building Legislation to be discussed: H.R. ____ , American Privacy Rights Act discussion draft (Rep. Rodgers)   H.R. 7891 , Kids Online Safety Act (Reps. Bilirakis, Bucshon, Castor, Houchin, Schrier)   H.R. 8449 , AM Radio for Every Vehicle Act (Reps. Bilirakis and Pallone)  This notice is at the direction of the Chair. The hearing will be open to the public and press and will be live streamed online at https://energycommerce.house.gov/ . If you have any questions concerning the hearing, please contact Jessica Herron at Jessica.Herron@mail.house.gov . If you have any press-related questions, please contact Sean Kelly at Sean.Kelly@mail.house.gov .